Oral Health For The Whole Family

shutterstock_88407139.download

shutterstock_88407139.download

When it comes to your health, it really pays to look after yourself and this doesn’t just apply to eating a healthy diet, avoiding too many takeaways and exercising now and again; it’s also really important to take good care of your teeth.

In modern times, a number of studies have linked poor oral health to problems linked to general health and researchers have found that neglecting this part of your health can increase the risk of a host of illnesses, including several that are life-threatening. Research teams all over the world have studied the connection between oral health and general health and the general consensus is that looking after your teeth and gums has never been so important. Studies have suggested that poor oral health increases the chances of strokes, heart disease, some forms of cancer, diabetes and even Alzheimer’s disease.

Oral health tips for children

It is never too early for children to start looking after their teeth and it is wrong for parents to assume that they do not need to pay attention to their children’s teeth because the first set falls out anyway. The milk teeth are designed to fall out, but if they are lost prematurely this can cause problems for the adult teeth and may affect the development and alignment of the permanent teeth, which may require teeth straightening with orthodontics. Dental problems, such as cavities and abscesses, can also cause children great discomfort and pain.

The good news is that gum disease and tooth decay are preventable and spending just a few minutes each day cleaning and brushing can make the world of difference.

Ideally, parents should start cleaning their children’s teeth as early as possible and it is beneficial to wipe the child’s gums even before their teeth start to erupt. As soon as children start to show an interest in holding a toothbrush, encourage them to take charge and show them how to brush their teeth using their toothbrush; even if it is a bit messy, it is a great way of getting children to develop an understanding of how to clean their teeth and encourage them to include teeth cleaning as part of their daily routine.

Making teeth cleaning fun

Most parents are familiar with the battle at bedtime to get their children to clean their teeth, but there are some simple ways to make teeth cleaning fun and encourage kids to brush without throwing a tantrum every time; here are some suggestions:

  • invest in children’s oral hygiene products, which are brightly coloured, tasty and often feature their favourite characters
  • play games and set children challenges to complete
  • play your child’s favourite song to encourage them to brush for the recommended time
  • reward good behaviour
  • set a good example and brush along with them

Diet

Diet is important for all the family when it comes to oral health; the simple tips from dentists are to avoid eating between meals, steer clear of acidic and sugary foods and drinks and to brush your teeth at least 45 minutes after eating. Foods that are good for your teeth include dairy products, which are rich in calcium, fruit and raw vegetables, nuts, seeds and oily fish.

Dental visits

Children are encouraged to attend their first dental visit at around the age of 12 months old; after this landmark occasion, check-ups should take place evry 6 months. Check-ups are really important for patients of all ages because they allow the dentist to keep an eye on what is going on in the mouth, identify any potential problems and address them before they get any worse; if you see your dentist every 6 months the risk of developing gum disease and decay is much lower.

Dental visits are nothing to worry about; they are very quick and they are not painful; your dentist will simply have a look around your mouth and then arrange your next check-up; if you do need treatment, this will be organised before your next scheduled routine check.

When it comes to your health, it really pays to look after yourself and this doesn’t just apply to eating a healthy diet, avoiding too many takeaways and exercising now and again; it’s also really important to take good care of your teeth.

In modern times, a number of studies have linked poor oral health to problems linked to general health and researchers have found that neglecting this part of your health can increase the risk of a host of illnesses, including several that are life-threatening. Research teams all over the world have studied the connection between oral health and general health and the general consensus is that looking after your teeth and gums has never been so important. Studies have suggested that poor oral health increases the chances of strokes, heart disease, some forms of cancer, diabetes and even Alzheimer’s disease.

Oral health tips for children

It is never too early for children to start looking after their teeth and it is wrong for parents to assume that they do not need to pay attention to their children’s teeth because the first set falls out anyway. The milk teeth are designed to fall out, but if they are lost prematurely this can cause problems for the adult teeth and may affect the development and alignment of the permanent teeth, which may require teeth straightening with orthodontics. Dental problems, such as cavities and abscesses, can also cause children great discomfort and pain.

The good news is that gum disease and tooth decay are preventable and spending just a few minutes each day cleaning and brushing can make the world of difference.

Ideally, parents should start cleaning their children’s teeth as early as possible and it is beneficial to wipe the child’s gums even before their teeth start to erupt. As soon as children start to show an interest in holding a toothbrush, encourage them to take charge and show them how to brush their teeth using their toothbrush; even if it is a bit messy, it is a great way of getting children to develop an understanding of how to clean their teeth and encourage them to include teeth cleaning as part of their daily routine.

Making teeth cleaning fun

Most parents are familiar with the battle at bedtime to get their children to clean their teeth, but there are some simple ways to make teeth cleaning fun and encourage kids to brush without throwing a tantrum every time; here are some suggestions:

  • invest in children’s oral hygiene products, which are brightly coloured, tasty and often feature their favourite characters
  • play games and set children challenges to complete
  • play your child’s favourite song to encourage them to brush for the recommended time
  • reward good behaviour
  • set a good example and brush along with them

Diet

Diet is important for all the family when it comes to oral health; the simple tips from dentists are to avoid eating between meals, steer clear of acidic and sugary foods and drinks and to brush your teeth at least 45 minutes after eating. Foods that are good for your teeth include dairy products, which are rich in calcium, fruit and raw vegetables, nuts, seeds and oily fish.

Dental visits

Children are encouraged to attend their first dental visit at around the age of 12 months old; after this landmark occasion, check-ups should take place evry 6 months. Check-ups are really important for patients of all ages because they allow the dentist to keep an eye on what is going on in the mouth, identify any potential problems and address them before they get any worse; if you see your dentist every 6 months the risk of developing gum disease and decay is much lower.

Dental visits are nothing to worry about; they are very quick and they are not painful; your dentist will simply have a look around your mouth and then arrange your next check-up; if you do need treatment, this will be organised before your next scheduled routine check.

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